Market News

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According to fresh findings from realtor.com®, there’s been an improvement in inventory nationwide—but what does that mean for this spring?

Compared to Feb. 2018, there were 6 percent more homes on the market this year, equaling 73,000 more listings, according to the Feb. 2019 realtor.com report. Inventory in the largest markets opened up substantially, with the biggest leaps in the West: 125 percent more in San Jose year-over-year; 85 percent more in Seattle; and 53 percent more in San Francisco.

For homes in the $750,000 or more range, inventory picked up 11 percent year-over-year. The same couldn’t be said for the $200,000 or less segment, with 7 percent fewer listings on the market.

The imbalance is an issue for millennials and others in the starter tier, who’ll have less options in their search this spring.

This excerp from RIS Media.    TO CONTINUE READING PLEASE  CLICK HERE

Buying a home is probably the biggest investment you will make, with long-term financial ramifications. It calls for many informed decisions and for good advice from a real estate professional.  Give me a call today for all of your real estate needs.

Stacy Schnell ~ Realtor Associate  Direct: 856-364-0772

Berkshire Hathawaty Fox & Roach ~ The Scott Sheppard Team

FHA Loan Guidelines for 2019

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Qualifying for a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan can be much easier compared with a conventional one. Borrowers will need a valid Social Security number, and be a lawful resident of legal age to be able to sign an FHA loan. Qualifying for a loan requires a minimum credit score of 500 in addition to a FHA-approved property appraisal and a favorable debt-to-income ratio.

This excerpt from Valuepenguin.com Click HERE to read more.

Visit my website stacyschnell.com for more helpful information on getting prepared to purchase a home or call me anytime, Id be happy to assist!

Stacy Schnell – Realtor Associate Cell: 856-364-0772

Home Prices: Boom Continues, but Leveling Out Needed

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The boom is continuing for home prices, with a gain in March of 6.5 percent, according to the S&P CoreLogic/Case-Shiller Indices.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price NSA Index’s 10-City Composite, which is an average of 10 metros (Boston, Chicago, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Diego, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.), rose 6.5 percent year-over-year, an increase from 6.4 percent in February. The 20-City Composite—which is an average of the 10 metros in the 10-City Composite, plus Atlanta, Charlotte, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Portland, Seattle and Tampa—rose 6.8 percent year-over-year, which is comparable to February. Month-over-month, both the 10-City Composite and the 20-City composite rose, 0.9 percent and 1 percent, respectively.

“The home price increases continue, with the National Index rising at 6.5 percent per year,” says David M. Blitzer, chairman and managing director of the S&P Dow Jones Indices Index Committee.

“Looking across various national statistics on sales of new or existing homes, permits for new construction, and financing terms, two figures that stand out are rapidly rising home prices and low inventories of existing homes for sale,” Blitzer says. “Months-supply, which combines inventory levels and sales, is currently at 3.8 months, lower than the levels of the 1990s before the housing boom and bust.

“Until inventories increase faster than sales, or the economy slows significantly, home prices are likely to continue rising,” says Blitzer. “Compared to the price gains of the last boom in the early 2000s, things are calmer today.”

“The solid gain in home prices of 6.5 percent in March added roughly $150 billion to housing wealth during the month,” said Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), in a statement. “The continuing run-up in home prices above the pace of income growth is simply not sustainable. From the cyclical low point in home prices six years ago, a typical home price has increased by 48 percent, while the average wage rate has grown by only 14 percent. Rising interest rates also do not help with affordability; therefore, more supply is needed to level out home prices. Homebuilding will be the key as to how the housing market performs in the upcoming years.”

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