Mortgage Rates in New Jersey

Current rates in New Jersey are 4.081% for a 30-year fixed, 3.587% for a 15-year fixed, and 4.017% for a 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM).
Mortgage Rates See Biggest One-Week Drop in a Decade. Mortgage rates fell more in the past week than they have in any one-week period in more than a decade. The average 30-year fixed loan has dropped 22 basis points to 4.06%, while 15-year fixed loans are down 14 basis points to 3.57%, according to Freddie Mac.Mar 28, 2019
Compare today’s average mortgage rates in the state of New Jersey. Bankrate aggregates mortgage rates from multiple sources to provide averages for New Jersey.

To Read more CLICK HERE

Mortgage News – First Time Home Buyer

First-Time Homebuyers Get a Break With Lower Mortgage Rates

(TNS)—Economic gurus got one part of the mortgage forecast for 2019 correct. We’re certainly seeing a volatile year for rates.

What they didn’t see coming: Mortgage rates tumbled in March, the biggest one-week fall in a decade. Now—instead of seeing mortgage rates edge closer to 5.25 percent, as some had predicted we’d see in 2019—we’re looking at an average 30-year rate near 4 percent.

The rate drop comes just in time for the spring home-buying season and will make monthly payments less expensive.

“This drop in rates is going to give the housing market a boost,” says Bill Banfield, executive vice president of Capital Markets for Quicken Loans. “It could help to make people come back into the market and consider buying a home.”

Mortgage rates have fallen by a full percentage point since late 2018. Going back four months or so, most forecasts weren’t expecting mortgage rates to drop as low as 4 percent for borrowers, Banfield says.

“This is a surprise to a lot of people,” Banfield says.

The average 30-year rate was 4.1 percent as of late March, the lowest rate since Jan. 2018, according to Bankrate.com data. But rates started to rebound a bit upward in early April. The average 30-year rate went back to 4.29 percent as of April 3, according to Bankrate.com.

By contrast, the average mortgage rate was 5.1 percent as recently as mid-November, which was a seven-year high, according to Bankrate.com. The average was hovering around 4.75 percent as 2018 drew to a close.

We’re talking about some real money here for homebuyers. Take a $200,000 mortgage. The mortgage payment for principal and interest would drop by about $120 a month if your rate is 4.1 percent instead of 5.1 percent on a 30-year mortgage, according to Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate.com. For the mortgage alone, the payment would be about $966 month at the 4.1 percent rate. It’s sort of like getting more than one month free each year.

For a homebuyer who was priced out of the market last spring, the lower rates could help get them back in the game.

Being able to lock in a 30-year fixed rate near, or even below, 4 percent helps put some “wind in the sails of home buyers from an affordability standpoint,” McBride says.

The 30-year fixed rate mortgage remains the dominant loan for middle-class borrowers, particularly first-time home buyers.

This excerpt from :  RIS Media.com      TO READ MORE CLICK HERE 

Stacy Schnell Real

 

Understanding Your Credit Score

What Is A Credit Score?

When lenders evaluate a loan application, a process called underwriting, they try to evaluate your ability and willingness to repay the loan. They judge the borrower’s ability to repay by reviewing the income and stability of past earnings. This practice helps the lender to determine if the borrower can afford the loan payments. The review of past credit history is used to judge the willingness of the borrower to repay the loan.

Lenders want their evaluation to be as accurate, objective and consistent as possible. To help achieve this goal, home mortgage lenders use credit scores to assist in the underwriting process. Credit scores are numerical values that rank individuals according to their credit history at a given point in time. A credit score is based on past payment history, the amount of available credit, and other factors. According to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two large investors in mortgage loans, credit scores have proven to be very good predictors of whether a borrower will repay his or her loan.

Credit scores are just one of many factors considered in the underwriting process. The lender will review the many components that make up the financial situation of a borrower. Even when a credit score is low, there are other factors that could overcome the negative credit issues and satisfy other underwriting criteria.

Click HERE to read more. As always, please feel free to call me anytime with your real

estate questions and needs.

Stacy Schnell – Realtor Associate – Cell : 856-364-0772

FHA Loan Guidelines for 2019

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Qualifying for a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan can be much easier compared with a conventional one. Borrowers will need a valid Social Security number, and be a lawful resident of legal age to be able to sign an FHA loan. Qualifying for a loan requires a minimum credit score of 500 in addition to a FHA-approved property appraisal and a favorable debt-to-income ratio.

This excerpt from Valuepenguin.com Click HERE to read more.

Visit my website stacyschnell.com for more helpful information on getting prepared to purchase a home or call me anytime, Id be happy to assist!

Stacy Schnell – Realtor Associate Cell: 856-364-0772

WHat do I need down to buy a home?

The down payment. Cue the dramatic, fear-filled suspense music. Yeah, it’s scary. Coming up with enough cash to put down when buying a house is the single biggest roadblock for most hopeful home buyers. But how much do you really need?

What is a down payment?

A down payment is the cash you pay upfront to get a home loan. It is deducted from the total amount of your mortgage and represents the beginning equity — your ownership stake — in a house and property.

This excerpt from Nerdwallet.com CLICK HERE to read more.

Below are a few of the questions clients often ask when making a purchase.

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Question: What qualifies me to be a first time home buyer ? 

A- If you’ve never owned a home, you are considered a first-time home buyer. But you are allowed to be a previous homeowner and still qualify as a first-time home buyer. According to the FHA, you can do so if you have not been an owner in a primary residence for at least three years leading up to your purchase.

Question: What are closing costs?

A: Closing costs are a fee charged for various items the lender charges. These fees are an additional cost that is added onto the amount of the loan. For example:  can include items such as loan processing fees, attorney’s fees, transfer taxes, title insurance costs, inspection fees, and more. You can ask for help with these fees in certain loan situations from the seller but still must supply your down payment for the loan.

Question: What is a seller concession?

A: When there is a seller concession in place, the seller will pay for part or all of the closing costs. Different loans offer different percentages that a seller can contribute.

Question: How much money will I need down? 

A: This depends on what type of financing that you qualify for with your mortgage company. Each depending on credit score and down payment.

FHA loan requires 3.5% down and you will need to get private mortgage insurance.FHA does allow closing costs to be paid by the seller. A friend or relative can also gift the closing cost amount to the borrower.

Conventional Loan can be as high as 20% but are now lending with 5% and even 3%. Conventional loan borrowers making a down payment of less than 20 percent will need to get private mortgage insurance (PMI). The good news is that once you reach a loan-to-value ratio of at least 78 percent, you can cancel the insurance. The only way to not pay your closing costs out of pocket would be to include a seller credit as a contingency of your offer.

USDA Rural Development or USDA loans come with 100% financing. This means that no money down is required and closing costs can be either paid by the seller or financed into the loan. In short, no-money-down means the home buyer is typically not required to pay any out-of-pocket expense when the house closes. … No Closing Costs.

How to qualify for a VA loan

To be eligible for a VA Loan, veterans, active duty service members, National Guard members and reservists must meet the basic service requirements set forth by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spouses of military members who died while on active duty or as a result of a service-connected disability may also be eligible.

It’s ultimately up to the VA to determine eligibility for the home loan program, but prospective borrowers can get a good idea by looking at the VA’s basic eligibility guidelines.

You may be eligible for a VA Home Loan if you meet one or more of the following conditions:

  • You have served 90 consecutive days of active service during wartime,OR
  • You have served 181 days of active service during peacetime,OR
  • You have more than 6 years of service in the National Guard or Reserves,OR
  • You are the spouse of a service member who has died in the line of duty or as a result of a service-related disability.
How to Apply for a VA Loan Certificate of Eligibility (COE)

While you don’t need your VA Certificate of Eligibility in hand to start the loan process with Veterans United, this certificate is a very important part of your loan application. Your COE verifies that your length and character of service make you eligible to use the VA home loan benefit.

You can apply for a VA Loan Certificate of Eligibility three different ways:

  1. Apply through a VA approved lender
  2. Apply online through the VA’s eBenefits portal
  3. Apply by mail with VA Form 26-1880

This exerpt from veteransunited.com